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Trip promotes farm exports


The nation's agriculture secretary announced an Asian trade mission Friday just days after new compacts were signed that are expected to significantly boost farm exports through the ports of Long Beach and Los Angeles.
Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack told the Press-Telegram that California farmers are enjoying a record year in food, meat and dairy exports expected to help shatter the nation's agricultural trade surplus.
Vilsack and Commerce Secretary John Bryson are traveling to China and Vietnam in mid-November, two of the local ports' top trading partners, to push for more cooperation and increased agricultural trade between the nations.
"In the past six years, we've seen a 1,000-percent increase in ag trade with Vietnam alone, and China is the country's top trade partner, so any movement we can make is definitely going to benefit California farmers, farm equipment manufacturers and (Southern California) ports," Vilsack said. "This has the potential to create many jobs, and not only in California, but across the country."
Asia has become the fastest-growing market for California's top farm exports, which include tree nuts, vegetables, fruits and dairy products.
As the nation's largest agricultural producer, California's wines, poultry, beef and pork are also increasingly popular in emerging Pacific Rim countries.
Last week, President Barack Obama signed three free-trade agreements with South Korea, Panama and Colombia.


While the Panamanian and Colombian deals will have a minimal impact on local ports, the South Korea deal is estimated to boost exports by
$10 billion annually, including about $1.9 billion worth of food and beverage products.
South Korea is currently the Port of Long Beach's third-largest export partner and second-largest import partner.
In 2010, some 4 million metric tons of food was exported through Long Beach, much of it to Asia. A large amount of farming equipment, including tractors, plows and tillers, is also exported locally.
That figure should rise steadily in coming years, Vilsack said.
"Our job during the visit is to try and continue the growth of recent years and reach a multilateral agreement with a number of countries, including Vietnam, by lowering the barriers that currently exist," Vilsack said.
California farmers are expected to post record sales this year, beating the estimated $35 billion in revenue reported in 2010. Of those food and beverage products exported, about half is handled by the ports of Long Beach and Los Angeles.
Vilsack said part of the trade mission will focus on creating what's known as the Trans-
Pacific Partnership. The plan calls for increased exports, lower tariffs and simplified trade barriers between the U.S. and Singapore, New Zealand, Vietnam, Australia, Chile, Brunei and Peru.
"Farmers this year are enjoying the best year they've had in 40 years when adjusted for inflation," Vilsack said.
Matt Herrick with the U.S. Department of Agriculture said it's expected American farmers will see $137 billion worth of exports and near-record income, and the country will see a record trade surplus of some $42 billion.
"Not many people see or hear about the strength of the ag economy, but it's booming," Herrick said.
The trade mission, recent agreements and the proposed Trans-Pacific Partnership are all measures related to President Obama's goal to double the value of all U.S. exports from from 2009 levels by 2014.
kristopher.hanson@presstelegram.com, 562-499-1466

Red Angus Grid Masters break record

Red Angus ranches and feeders achieved a new level of excellence this year as 64 loads of cattle--over 2,500 head--reached tremendous yield and quality combinations to earn Grid Master status. The Red Angus Association of America presented 47 producers with the Grid Master Award at the Red Angus National Convention held in Durham, N.C., in September. This is the largest number of Grid Masters ever recognized in the eight-year history of the award.
"The RAAA presented a challenge to breeders, commercial ranches and feed yards to harvest Red Angus cattle at tighter quality and yield specifications than ever before," said RAAA Director of Value Added Programs Myron Edelman. "Not only did Red Angus producers hit a more difficult target, they exceeded the Grid Master record for the third consecutive year."
RAAA raised the threshold by increasing the percentage of cattle that grade Choice or better, while lowering the percentage of Yield Grade 4 carcasses.
Red Angus cattle produce valuable carcasses and are very good at meeting grid specs that increase the profit margin on the rail, said Edelman. Producers who enroll their Red Angus-influenced cattle in the Feeder Calf Certification Program and apply the yellow Red Angus tag are eligible to submit harvest data for Grid Master consideration.
Conventional-fed cattle meet the following requirements: minimum of 30-head lot size, minimum 85 percent Choice or higher, maximum 5 percent Yield Grade 4, and minimum Grid Score of 100.
To account for the different finishing characteristics of natural-fed cattle, lots must meet the following criteria: minimum of 30-head lot size, minimum 90 percent Choice or higher, maximum 10 percent Yield Grade 4, and minimum Grid Score of 100.
All four major packers--U.S. Premium Beef, JBS USA, Tyson and Cargill--harvested Red Angus Grid Master qualifiers in 10 different plant locations. Myer Natural Angus reported the largest number of Grid Master winners with 30 lots, and the Painted Hills Natural Program also harvested award-winning Red Angus cattle.
"Challenging those who produce and feed Red Angus cattle has proven to only make them rise to the level of the task," said Edelman. "This has strengthened the value of Red Angus by building reputations of cattle that we know have proven maternal traits, the ability to efficiently convert feed and produce a valuable end product."
The following producers and feeders were awarded 2011 Grid Master Awards. Several received more than one award.
Joe Lindsey of Byers, Colo., with feedyard Kuenning & Son Inc. of Imperial, Neb.; Meyer Company Ranch of Helmville, Mont., with feedyard HBF of Haxton, Colo.; Robert Gibbs of Jordan, Mont., with feedyard Circle G Farms of Waco, Neb.; Skinner Ranches of Jordan Valley, Ore., with feedyard Kuenning & Son, Inc. of Imperial, Neb.; Kerry Holscher of Waubay, S.D., with feedyard Brent Thompson of Elkhorn, S.D.; Mike Kokesch of Stewart, Minn., with feedyard Mike Kokesch of Stewart, Minn.; Michael Wasson of Dresden, Kan., with feedyard Prairie Dog Creek Cattle Co. of Dresden, Kan.; DeLong Ranches of Winnemucca, Nev., with feedyard Kuenning & Son, Inc. of Imperial, Neb.; DeLong Ranches of Winnemucca, Nev.; Feeder: Frank Wedel of Leoti, Kan., with feedyard Decatur County Feed Yard of Oberlin, Kan.; Bill Blauw of Strausburg, Colo., with feedyard Yankton Land and Cattle Co. of Yankton, S.D.; John Lancaster of Glendo, Wyo., with feedyard Magnum Feeders of Wiggins, Colo.; Sargent Cattle Co. of San Ardo, Calif., with feedyard Kuenning & Son, Inc. of Imperial, Neb.; Ranches, Inc. (Brian Downey) of Fort Morgan, Colo., with feedyard Kuenning & Son, Inc. of Imperial, Neb.; Leland Cattle Co. (Butch Grandy) of Farson, Wyo., with feedyard Royal Beef of Scott City, Kan.; Christensen Bros. of Weldona, Colo., with feedyard Christensen Bros. of Weldona, Colo.; Anderson Land & Cattle Co. of Oberlin, Kan., with feedyard Anderson Land & Cattle Co. of Oberlin, Kan.; Croissant Red Angus of Briggsdale, Colo., with feedyard Croissant Red Angus of Briggsdale, Colo.; Pelton Red Angus of Burdett, Kan., with feedyard High Choice Feeders of Scott City, Kan.; Ferguson Farms of Abilene, Kan., with feedyard Royal Beef of Scott City, Kan.; Spreutels Farm of Koshkonong, Mo., with feedyard Spreutels Farm of Koshkonong, Mo.; Robert Gibbs of Jordan, Mont.; Anthony Ranch of Jal, N.M.; Chip Fischer of Rhame, N.D., with feedyard Circle G of Waco, Neb.; Lorenzen Ranches of Pendleton, Ore., with feedyard Beef North West of North Powder, Ore.; Durheim Ranch of Ellendale, N.D., with feedyard Dana Dennert of Columbia, S.D.; Yancy Sowers of Oberlin, Kan., with feedyard Anderson Land & Cattle Co. of Oberlin, Kan.; Veril & Barbara Nelson of Oakland, Ore., with feedyard Simplot Feeders Limited of Pasco, Wash.; Heart River Ranch of Belfield, N.D., with feedyard Century Feeders of Goodland, Kan.; Leon Tuttle of Gove, Kan., with feedyard Century Feeders of Goodland, Kan.; and Bull Hill Ranch of Gray Court, S.C., with feedyard Ranger Feeders of Dighton, Kan.
Joe Lindsey of Byers, Colo., with feedyard Kuenning & Son Inc. of Imperial, Neb.; Meyer Company Ranch of Helmville, Mont., with feedyard HBF of Haxton, Colo.; Robert Gibbs of Jordan, Mont., with feedyard Circle G Farms of Waco, Neb.; Skinner Ranches of Jordan Valley, Ore., with feedyard Kuenning & Son, Inc. of Imperial, Neb.; Kerry Holscher of Waubay, S.D., with feedyard Brent Thompson of Elkhorn, S.D.; Mike Kokesch of Stewart, Minn., with feedyard Mike Kokesch of Stewart, Minn.; Michael Wasson of Dresden, Kan., with feedyard Prairie Dog Creek Cattle Co. of Dresden, Kan.; DeLong Ranches of Winnemucca, Nev., with feedyard Kuenning & Son, Inc. of Imperial, Neb.; DeLong Ranches of Winnemucca, Nev.; Feeder: Frank Wedel of Leoti, Kan., with feedyard Decatur County Feed Yard of Oberlin, Kan.; Bill Blauw of Strausburg, Colo., with feedyard Yankton Land and Cattle Co. of Yankton, S.D.; John Lancaster of Glendo, Wyo., with feedyard Magnum Feeders of Wiggins, Colo.; Sargent Cattle Co. of San Ardo, Calif., with feedyard Kuenning & Son, Inc. of Imperial, Neb.; Ranches, Inc. (Brian Downey) of Fort Morgan, Colo., with feedyard Kuenning & Son, Inc. of Imperial, Neb.; Leland Cattle Co. (Butch Grandy) of Farson, Wyo., with feedyard Royal Beef of Scott City, Kan.; Christensen Bros. of Weldona, Colo., with feedyard Christensen Bros. of Weldona, Colo.; Anderson Land & Cattle Co. of Oberlin, Kan., with feedyard Anderson Land & Cattle Co. of Oberlin, Kan.; Croissant Red Angus of Briggsdale, Colo., with feedyard Croissant Red Angus of Briggsdale, Colo.; Pelton Red Angus of Burdett, Kan., with feedyard High Choice Feeders of Scott City, Kan.; Ferguson Farms of Abilene, Kan., with feedyard Royal Beef of Scott City, Kan.; Spreutels Farm of Koshkonong, Mo., with feedyard Spreutels Farm of Koshkonong, Mo.; Robert Gibbs of Jordan, Mont.; Anthony Ranch of Jal, N.M.; Chip Fischer of Rhame, N.D., with feedyard Circle G of Waco, Neb.; Lorenzen Ranches of Pendleton, Ore., with feedyard Beef North West of North Powder, Ore.; Durheim Ranch of Ellendale, N.D., with feedyard Dana Dennert of Columbia, S.D.; Yancy Sowers of Oberlin, Kan., with feedyard Anderson Land & Cattle Co. of Oberlin, Kan.; Veril & Barbara Nelson of Oakland, Ore., with feedyard Simplot Feeders Limited of Pasco, Wash.; Heart River Ranch of Belfield, N.D., with feedyard Century Feeders of Goodland, Kan.; Leon Tuttle of Gove, Kan., with feedyard Century Feeders of Goodland, Kan.; and Bull Hill Ranch of Gray Court, S.C., with feedyard Ranger Feeders of Dighton, Kan.

http://www.hpj.com/archives/2011/oct11/oct31/1026RedAngusGridMasters1PIX.cfm?title=Red%20Angus%20Grid%20Masters%20break%20record

Meat scientists work to enhance marbling in beef cattle

Kansas State University Extension
Several university researchers are collaborating to find ways to increase marbling in beef cattle without adding extra days on high-concentrate diets.
“With high feed costs and the high cost of gain for cattle feeders, what if we could achieve the same degree of marbling with less days on feed?” said Texas Tech meat scientist, Brad Johnson. “We feel that that’s where the economic advantage is.”
Johnson has been working on a five-year study, along with Ki Yong Chung, also of Texas Tech, Stephen Smith and Seong Ho Choi of Texas A&M University and Matthew Doumit of the University of Idaho to better understand regulation of marbling development by fatty acids in beef cattle.
The study was funded by the Kansas Beef Council through Beef Checkoff funds.
Johnson began work on the project while at Kansas State University. He joined the Texas Tech faculty three years ago as the Gordon W. Davis Regent’s Chair in Meat and Muscle Biology. The findings of the team’s research to date were presented at the American Meat Science Association’s Reciprocal Meat Conference held in Manhattan earlier this year.
“We know marbling increases the palatability of beef, the juiciness and indirectly increases tenderness,” Johnson said. “Cattle on grass tend to have lower marbling scores than corn-fed cattle. Grass is very high in a particular fatty acid – alpha Lenolenic acid, and we feel that a little of that moves through the rumen and could actually repress marbling development in beef cattle.”
On the other hand, in feedlot cattle, starch from corn and grain sorghum in the diet elevates levels of oleic acid, which is a monounsaturated fatty acid. The research team believes that fatty acid is important in stimulating marbling development in cattle, he said.
While there’s not always a big difference in the price spread between choice and select – two beef grades that indicate the amount of marbling (fat within the muscle) – over time there’s enough of a price difference to show that the amount of marbling does matter, he said.
“We’ve been able to take these cells out of tissue and grow them in a culture system and add specific fatty acids to see how that impacts differentiation of cells into marbling,” Johnson said. “We’ve also looked at potential receptors that are imbedded in the cell’s surface, and have found that marbling at different sites – the cells that make up marbling – have a different profile of receptors than say, backfat at different sites. We felt that we can manipulate that difference to enhance marbling without making the cattle fatter.”
He cited work by Smith at Texas A&M, that’s shown that the older the animal, the less some of the receptors are available in backfat, which would imply that marbling should come a little easier with age.
“With the cost of gain the way it is, feed efficiency is so critical to feedlot operators. We feel that if we can enhance marbling with fewer days on feed or less expensive feed ingredients, that would be a win-win situation,” the researcher said.
“The bottom line is that triggering these cells probably at a very early age to become marbling at different sites, and let them lay idle for awhile, once we bring them into the feedlot, they should really enhance marbling,” Johnson said. “That’s the ultimate goal that we’re trying to achieve.”
Johnson said the breed of cattle makes a difference.
“Some breeds typically found in the U.S. system have a higher propensity to marble,” he said. “But the ultimate gold standard is to look at the Asian breeds, such as the Japanese Black, a Waygu breed in Japan, Chinese Yellowtail and the Korean Hanwoo cattle, those cattle have a high ability to deposit marble. Interestingly, they tend to be lighter muscled, and if you look at our U.S. production system, we tend to select a little more balance for muscle and marbling. Also, from a management standpoint, about everything we do in the feedlot to enhance growth, like steroidal implants, we enhance muscle but we have the opposite effect on marbling.”
Marbling scores are independent of market weight, the scientist said.
“With typical breeds in the U.S., we tend as cattle feeders, to talk about another two to three weeks on a pen of cattle. Generally what will happen is we will allow some of those greener cattle to catch up and maybe express their genetic potential to marble. Those cattle that were already an average choice or low choice three weeks prior, they don’t necessarily go up (in marbling score) anymore,” he said. “So we allow these other cattle to catch up in a pen. But it’s well established that more days on feed is not going to change the individual animal’s marbling score dramatically, even as we increase the weight of those animals.”
The opposite is true with Asian-type cattle. They tend to grow at a slower rate of gain for long periods of time, Johnson said. They tend to increase marbling as the number of days on feed are increased, so there’s a genetic difference in those cattle.
“My long-term goal is to come up with some sort of intervention strategy -- a feed additive or implant similar to what we administer to cattle for growth enhancement -- where timing may be critical with the ultimate goal to turn on marbling, but not make the cattle fatter,” he said. “As we increase overall fatness in cattle, feed efficiency worsens. Obviously in today’s paradigm, we can’t have that with the way feed costs are.”
Johnson also cited work by Texas A&M’s Smith on oleic acid in marbling: “Generally, as we increase marbling, we increase oleic acid concentration and Dr. Smith has done a lot of work showing the human health benefits of increased oleic acid. The goal, from a beef demand standpoint, is to show that increased oleic acid is heart-healthy and positive for human health. If it’s positively correlated to more marbling, that’s a win-win situation for the beef cattle industry.”

Moscas podem diminuir o peso do gado em até 20%

O clima sul-matogrossense em período de chuvas favorece a proliferação das moscas, que preferem a umidade em torno de 25 graus. Esses insetos podem diminuir o peso do bovino de 15% a 20%, provocando a queda de até 60% na produção de leite do animal. Em busca de soluções sobre o tema, profissionais e pesquisadores rurais se reuniram nessa segunda, dia 21, no auditório da Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuária (Embrapa), em Campo Grande (MS), para o Workshop Mosca-dos-Estábulos.
Mosca-dos-chifres, carrapato do boi e mosca-dos-estábulos são consideradas pelos produtores de gado as maiores pragas possíveis, podendo ser responsáveis por grandes prejuízos. As moscas atacam principalmente as pernas do bovino com picadas doloridas, além de seu costado e dorso. O inseto por ser irritante ao gado, ele faz com que o animal se debata causando lesões de automutilação, provocando perda de peso e a conseqüente redução no valor e qualidade da carne do animal.
– O conhecimento sobre a biologia dos insetos pelos produtores é muito superficial, o que dificulta o seu entendimento sobre a real necessidade de controle e a aceitação das recomendações de controle, em especial o estratégico – afirma o biólogo e entomologista, Wilson Wener Koller.
Em Mato Grosso do Sul o grupo de pesquisa da Embrapa desenvolveu 58 testes em 38 propriedades rurais e os resultados indicaram 97,4% resistência das moscas quanto as piretróides, venenos que trabalham com intuito de manter os canais de sódio abertos nas membranas neurais dos insetos. Porém, segundo os dados da Embrapa, o processo de higienização dos pastos e o manejo adequado dos subprodutos, com o controle dos focos de criação das moscas, representam 90% de sucesso.
– Restos de alimentos úmidos e palha, juntos aos dejetos dos animais, são os principais motivos do desenvolvimento das moscas que se abrigam em árvores, bosques, cercas, paredes e cochos, e se dispersam de 10 a 30 quilômetros, com possibilidade de atingir até 200 quilômetros a mais de distância. A mosca em apenas três minutos suga o suficiente para ficar repleta de sangue – disse o pesquisador da Embrapa, Wilson Koller.
Há um número limitado de pessoas para realizar o tratamento do modo correto e no devido tempo, em especial com respeito ao estágio de desenvolvimento da praga. Muitos produtores não utilizam o produto adequado, e quando se utiliza, a dosagem é superior ou inferior a recomendada. Essas foram algumas das preocupações expostas durante o Workshop.
– Para orientação dos produtores e indústrias, de como se portar e evitar os problemas ocasionados pela mosca-do-estábulo, a Associação dos Produtores de Bioenergia de Mato Grosso do Sul (Biosul) já apoiou seis eventos referente ao tema e emitimos folders de orientação – afirma o presidente da Biosul, Roberto Hollanda.
A falta de controle da praga por um profissional qualificado, ou no mínimo orientado quanto às precauções com as moscas, pode gerar retorno negativo, bem como o acréscimo no custo da produção, prejuízo na rentabilidade, problemas com barreiras sanitárias e infestação que pode persistir e ainda se agravar.
A Biosul, junto a Federação de Agricultura e Pecuária de Mato Grosso do Sul (Famasul), participam de dois eventos por ano, desde 2009, em busca de soluções referentes aos problemas ocasionados por insetos na zona rural dos municípios do Estado.
– Apoiamos dois eventos por ano para contribuir com a eliminação das pragas que agem contra o gado, entre seminários, workshops e treinamentos no interior e na capital. Intencionamos contribuir com a lucratividade do produtor e com a harmonia na produção de região – afirma Hollanda.
BIOSUL E FAMASUL





http://www.agromundo.com.br/?p=23258

Trust Is The Beginning Of Everything In A Family Business

Without trust between family members, running a multi-generation ranch is very difficult.
Sydney Smith, an 18th century English writer and clergyman, once advised: "Take short views, hope for the best and trust in God."

While the third part of Smith's advice is everlasting, the first two components aren't very conducive to running a family business today. Running a successful multi-generation ranch today takes a long-term outlook and careful planning.

However, whatever you attempt to do in a family business–leadership succession, installing a board of directors, a family meeting, developing a family constitution, a business plan or an estate plan – nothing can be successfully accomplished without the presence of the one key ingredient of trust.

That's the advice of William Alexander, a faculty member of the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School who brings with him his experience as a third-generation CEO of a central Pennsylvania construction company. Unfortunately, Alexander says, many families choose to move forward with their business and family governance without taking the time to ensure that trust is present in the family business system.

"Such actions, without trust, at best will require much more time to accomplish and, at worse, will fail," he says. "Therefore, it is essential for families who own and operate businesses to know what trust is, to know how to be trusted as an individual in a family business system, and to know how to repair damaged system trust."

For the purposes of a family business, Alexander says trust should be defined as a "feeling that another person, a group of people, or the system as a whole is performing in your best interests." Test this definition by thinking of someone you trust completely, he suggests. "Do you not feel that this person has your best interests as a top priority?"

Trust comes in various forms, he says, some good and some bad. "If you have a high propensity to trust and act spontaneously rather than with proper analysis, you may be guilty of blind trust, which isn't good," he says. "Blind trust doesn't promote proper discourse on subjects you don't understand. For example, if you have blind trust in a parent who has always provided for you, you will accept their decisions to establish a dynasty trust for future business ownership without proper discussion and analysis by all affected parties."

The type of trust that families who own and operate businesses need is "smart trust," where you combine a high propensity to trust with a desire for proper analysis of interchange between parties, he says.
However, if you are to possess "smart trust," you need to ask yourself two questions. "First, what is my propensity to trust other people? Second, what is my willingness to make the effort to analyze another person's actions to ascertain if they should be trusted? In other words, are you the type of person who wants to trust another person until they do something that causes you to withdraw your trust, or are you the type of person who does not trust anyone until they do something that justifies your trust?" The former, Alexander says, is preferred in a family business over the latter.

So, how do you as an individual either maintain the trust of those family members who have a propensity to trust or gain the trust of family members who have a propensity to distrust? Alexander says there are four key actions:
  • Ensure all family members perceive your motives as genuine and credible. Constantly ask them if this is the case.
  • Ensure your communications contain crystal-clear content (no hidden agendas) as well as an emphatic "I care about you" consideration.
  • Ensure every promise you make is kept.
  • Demonstrate competence that leaves family members assured they are dealing with someone with the capacity to perform.
Finally, Alexander says you may have to address this question – if you perfect these four building actions but other family members do not, how can you act as a trust catalyst to establish trust within the family business system? This is a difficult question to answer, he says, because trust is such a hard-to-define concept and family members may possess an historic, deep-seated aversion to trusting other family members.

"The first thing to do is to acknowledge publically that a trust issue exists. Trust will never be restored if its absence is not acknowledged," he says. "Next, use good insight into gaining an understanding of how trust was lost. Many times, this investigation will reveal that the underlying reasons for the initial breakdown of trust no longer exist."

Finally, he says, get all parties to focus on their role in this breakdown and commit to practicing the four steps to earning trust listed above. "Remember that you, as a trust catalyst, must never take any action during this process which would cause you to lose the trust of the group in which you are trying to build trust," he says.


http://beefmagazine.com/cowcalfweekly/1125-trust-beginning-of-everything/

Walmart y FORTAS al rescate de la agricultura

Más de 55 agricultores del municipio de Caluco están siendo beneficiados por la primera fase del plan de rescate a la agricultura, desarrollado por Walmart a través del Programa FORTAS de FUSADES para lograr la reactivación de los cultivos que se perdieron por las pasadas lluvias, informó el Gerente de Hortifruti de Walmart, Alder Sevilla.

A consecuencia de los grandes estragos ocasionados por las pasadas tormentas,  los agricultores de Caluco perdieron casi la totalidad de sus cultivos de hortalizas y granos básicos, producción que se vendería  a Hortifruti de Walmart, como parte de la alianza permanente de comercialización  con dicha compañía  que les generan importantes ingresos muestra de ello es que de enero a octubre de este año han  vendido más de US$170.000 en hortalizas y verduras.
El plan de rescate a la agricultura de  Walmart y FORTAS consiste en apoyar a los agricultores con la dotación de insumos agrícolas consistentes en semillas de cultivos de ciclo corto como primera fase y colateralmente plantines de hortalizas de ciclo largo, fertilizantes, combustible para apoyar el riego por goteo existente en la zona y asistencia técnica integral brindada por los técnicos del Programa FORTAS de FUSADES para lograr la calidad que los ha caracterizado y comercializar así la producción a través de Hortifruti.
En la primera fase se benefician a más de  55 agricultores a través de un donativo de más de  US$9.000 aportados por Walmart al programa FORTAS de FUSADES.
Walmart inicio desde el 2008 el apoyo a los agricultores en Caluco con el apoyo FORTAS de FUSADES y la Alcaldía Municipal de Caluco.
“Desde  hace 3 años se inició la reactivación en Caluco con el programa piloto de diversificación de agricultura a través de FORTAS iniciando con el financiamiento de sistemas de riego modernos, facilitando insumos para producir hortalizas las cuales son comercializadas directamente por los agricultores y vendidos a Hortifruti de Walmart”, recordó la Gerente de Asuntos Corporativos de Walmart, Claudia de Ibáñez quien destacó que desde el 2008 hasta la fecha han vendido casi medio millón de dólares a Hortifruti.
“Cuando Walmart vino a este lugar, la mayoría de sus habitantes no creían que cambiar sus cultivos de siempre por  frutas y hortalizas les podía generar ingresos importantes, hay familias que vivían de US$30 mensuales, un dólar diario, cantidades que hoy en día se han incrementado a ingresos de hasta más de US$600 mensuales por familia”, recordó el Gerente de Hortifruti, Alder Sevilla.

http://www.estrategiaynegocios.net/2011/11/17/walmart-y-fortas-al-rescate-de-la-agricultura/

Marketing Moves - Going Local with Beef Sales



Building a market to sell home-finished beef is all about consistency. You not only have to provide tasty, tender beef one year, but every year. And there is a formula, some cattlemen say, to hitting the mark every time. The best place to start, they stress, is with the genetics of the animal.
Burlington, W. Va., cattleman Rick Woodworth sells home-finished beef to individuals and also markets it through his family's farm market and deli. "We're Angus-based," he says. "We select for the meat traits, rib-eye area, marbling, because we're in the meat business. But we're still in the cattle business, so the cows have to milk, be functionally correct and have longevity. We look at the total package."
Darrell Rankins, Cusseta, Ala., prefers Angus-Gelbvieh cross cattle. He sells to all local customers, who pay the processor a kill fee for the animal, as well as a per-pound processing fee. Average prices to the buyer are $2 per pound live-weight before these fees.
Rankins says he watches maternal and growth traits closely. "You can trump genetics sometimes, but you need to have something that will mature at 1,100 pounds. You don't need one at 1,400 pounds."
Still, carcass Expected Progeny Differences are on his list. "I don't emphasize them, but, for example, I certainly want breed average or better on the percentage of intramuscular fat on an Angus bull," he says.
AGE MATTERS
Both cattlemen only finish young animals. For Rankins, steers are 16 to 18 months old when harvested. Heifers can go up to 22 months. Woodworth's cattle are in the same age range.
Auburn University Meat Scientist Christy Bratcher agrees with that practice. "The older the animal, the more cross-linking of the connective tissue it has and therefore the less tender it is."
At Rankins' operation he normally chooses the lightweight steers out of the cattle he markets in a preconditioned board sale in August. They weigh 580 to 600 pounds and will stay on the same soy hull--based ration he uses for preconditioning.
"We grow them along until they weigh 750 to 800 pounds," he explains. "Then we start pushing them on corn."
Rankins takes a cautious approach when transitioning to corn. He starts by putting steers in a small dry lot and hand-feeding them 3 pounds per head, per day. He increases the amount over a five- to six-day period up to 17 to 18 pounds of corn per head, per day, around 2% of their body weight. Rankins keeps the steers on corn for 100 days, during which time they gain 3.2 pounds a day.
"There is a great potential for founder with corn," warns Rankins, who is also an Auburn University animal scientist. The steers also get half a percent of their body weight in hay. "It doesn't have to be good-quality hay, but it does need to be long-stemmed," he says. "That provides the scratch factor, salivation and rumenation."
Heifers usually don't enter his finishing enterprise until they are pregnancy-checked and found open in April. They weigh around 900 pounds at that point and go straight to corn.
Whether it's steers or heifers, Rankins says grain-finishing is a given. "When you put young calves on a high-energy feed, they start depositing intramuscular fat. That's marbling."
Woodworth is another proponent of grain-finished beef. His spring-weaned calves graze fescue, orchardgrass and clover pastures until fall. At that point, they go to the feedlot for corn silage and grain. His fall-weaned calves skip the grazing and go straight to a corn silage and grain ration. He feeds both sets of calves for a minimum of 120 days. "They need to be full fed on corn in order to grade Choice or high-end Select at the minimum," he says. "You get a better eating experience as you move up the quality grade."
GRASS-FED A GAMBLE
When it comes to grass-finishing, both Rankins and Woodworth would rather leave that to someone else. "Some people like the taste, and that's fine," Rankins says. "But if I eat grass-fed beef 10 times, three or four times it has an off flavor to me. I don't want to gamble."
Auburn's Bratcher says consistency can be a challenge with grass-finished beef because it is determined by both genetics and environment. "You don't know from one year to another if you're going to have a drought or a wet year. Also, warm- and cool-season grasses both have different flavor profiles."
PROCESSING PHASE
Both Rankins and Woodworth dry-age their beef. Rankins ages his for three weeks, Woodworth normally ages his two weeks.
"With dry-aging, you normally get a 3.5% cooler shrink," Woodworth says. "Losing that moisture intensifies the beef taste. Both wet- and dry-aging enhance tenderness, and I feel it needs to be aged."
Bratcher agrees. "Either way, the same enzymes work to break down the muscle fibers."
As for length of time to age, she says research with steers shows there's no benefit to aging past 14 days, but heifers need an additional seven days. "To be on the safe side, 21 days of aging should show marked improvement in the tenderness of any carcass."
For Rankins, it is the sum of all the points. And he's so confident of his product, he backs it up. "If they are young calves, finished on corn and aged three weeks, I give a 100% money-back guarantee."

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Ventajas comparativas y garbanzo transgénico, para un cultivo alternativo y rentable

Técnicos de la Eeaoc destacaron el precio y la nueva semilla, que se inscribió en el INASE. Buen estado de lotes sembrados.

El garbanzo es una leguminosa cuyo grano tiene un alto valor alimenticio y su consumo es importante en países como la India, Pakistán y Turquía, que dejó de producir garbanzo para producir verduras para la comunidad Europea. "Con los diversos problemas de producción de tiene Canadá, la Argentina se ubica en una posición destacada para la producción y comercialización de este grano", señalaron Oscar Vizgarra y Clara Espeche, técnicos del proyecto legumbres secas de la Eeaoc.

Apuntaron que el país puede llegar a una capacidad de comercialización superior a las 300.000 toneladas, pero para ello es necesario diversificar el tipo de garbanzo, produciendo tanto la variedad kabuli como deci, que son garbanzos de alto consumo en India.

Para esta campaña el cultivo tuvo un crecimiento significativo respecto de las campañas anteriores, y esto se manifestó en la cantidad de superficie sembrada, tanto en Tucumán como en el resto del área productora del país. Este impulso fue debido al precio que se llegó a pagar la tonelada del grano en la campaña 2010, una mejor alternativa que el cultivo del trigo (respecto del costo/beneficio).

En Tucumán y su zona de influencia (sudeste de Catamarca y oeste santiagueño) el área sembrada superó las 25.000 ha y a nivel país se estima que la superficie fue superior a las 80.000 ha.

Argentina exportó durante 2010 un volumen de 80.000 t según cifras oficiales, y en esa campaña el total de los cultivos sembrados durante el otoño-invierno el 36% fue de arveja; el 21% para lenteja; 39% para trigo y el 6% para garbanzo, este último un cultivo casi desconocido hasta hace cinco años.

El cultivo de garbanzo va tomando auge desde hace unos años y se debe en parte a su difusión desde instituciones como la Eeaoc. La institución, a través del Proyecto Legumbres Secas, viene trabajando desde 2002 con la leguminosa, introduciendo germoplasma desde el International Center for Agricultura Research in the Dry Areas (Icarda), Siria.

El trabajo de investigación de estas legumbres en la Eeaoc se realiza a través de un trabajo interdisciplinario acompañando al mejoramiento genético, con otros como estudio de fertilización (en suelo y foliar), control de malezas en pre- y posemergencia, evaluación de hormonas (giberelinas, citocininas y promotores de crecimiento), uso de fungicidas, manejo del gusano del cascabullo, análisis de calidad de grano y semillas, análisis de costo producción y margen bruto, todos estos aspectos indispensable para ajustar el manejo integral del cultivo.

Respecto de este mejoramiento genético encarado por la Eeaoc, se vienen evaluando y seleccionando materiales desde 2002, y hasta el momento se identificaron dos materiales de tipo sauco muy promisorios, que se caracterizan por su rendimiento. Superan al testigo local (Norteño), porte erecto, buena calidad comercial y tamaño de grano, y uno de ellos de alta precocidad. Se están completando las planillas de inscripción para ser elevado al INASE y se espera que en el corto plazo estén disponibles para el productor.

Los garbanzos en esta campaña, se encuentran en general en buen estado, destacándose los lotes sembrados en fechas adecuadas, de recientes desmontes, con perfil de humedad adecuado y con cultivos antecesores como maíz o sorgo y donde ocurrieron lluvias de importancia agronómica en septiembre.

Esta ultima situación ocurrió cuando el estadio fenológico era favorable a las respuestas en el rendimiento, ya que los garbanzos estaban finalizando la floración y en plena fructificación. Por ello, los rindes esperados en general podrían variar entre 800 a 1.400 kg/ha, pero se deben destacar lotes en buen estado donde los rindes superarán a los 2.000 kg.
http://www.lagaceta.com.ar/nota/462267/Rural/Ventajas-comparativas-garbanzo-transgenico-para-cultivo-alternativo-rentable.html

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